2011 Lexus LFA can now be bought without a leasing program

Article by Christian A., on August 27, 2010

A brand-new 2011 Lexus LFA sports car can now be acquired without being committed to a lease program. According to Lexus representatives, there are now three ways to acquire a brand-new LFA priced at $375,000.

Aside from Lexus' 24-month, 1Pay lease program, customers can opt for retail financing for the supercar, or buy the vehicle outright.

These last two options were added last June to attract customers who wish for some flexibility in acquiring an LFA. However, these two options have a legal caveat attached.

If within two years of delivery, the owner chooses to sell, re-lease, or transfer ownership of the car, the original Lexus dealer gets first refusal to re-acquire the vehicle. It's not too surprising that this rider is attached to the purchase plan.

If you recall, Lexus' original idea for the LFA was to lease it to select customers for a couple of years, permitting Lexus to limit speculation and third-party markup for used LFAs.

Brian Smith, Lexus' vice president of sales, had said previously that the brand wants people to be out driving the 4.8-liter, 552hp V-10 car and not just "parking it in a museum or selling it at an inflated price."

The new 2011 Lexus LFA supercar is a product of a true "clean-sheet" design. This new supercar was conceived and built by a small team of passionate and dedicated engineers who have worked hard to employ state-of-the-art technologies, materials and engineering at every phase just to create a unique car good enough to bear the Lexus badge.

In fact, the rear-wheel drive Lexus LFA was built employing advanced carbon fiber technology. It is powered by a bespoke 4.8-liter naturally aspirated V10 engine that produces 552bhp and is mated to a rear-mounted six-speed sequential automatic gearbox. With this power in disposal, the Lexus LFA could run at speeds of more than 200 mph.

Lexus wanted the LFA to be as light as possible. Aluminum was considered as construction material but Lexus eventually settled for the much lighter advanced Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) for the LFA's chassis and bodywork.

Instead of sourcing the CFRP structure from a third-party supplier, Lexus opted to have it built in-house. To do so, it engaged Toyota Motor Corp.'s textile weaving technology to develop new carbon fiber looms as well as a new laser system to monitor the integrity of the material.

Chief Engineer Haruhiko Tanahashi described the Lexus LFA as a thoroughbred supercar engineered to deliver a supreme driving experience. Tanahashi added that following a decade of pursuing such a car, it has finally created the most driver-oriented car.

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