2011 Nissan Leaf rated by EPA at 99 mpg, becomes best in class for fuel efficiency

Article by Christian Andrei, on November 22, 2010

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved today its fuel-economy label for the 100-percent electric Nissan LEAF and announced that the vehicles was rated as being the "best" in the midsize vehicle class for fuel efficiency but also for the environment.

2011 Nissan LEAF received a best-in-class 99 miles-per-gallon (MPG) equivalent (combined city/highway).

The car was also rated best-in-class for the environment based on emitting zero greenhouse gases or any other traditional tailpipe emissions.

The car received an mpg equivalent of 106 city, 92 highway and obtained a combined 99 mpg. The numbers were obtained using EPA's formula of 33.7kW-hrs being equivalent to one gallon gasoline energy.

In addition, the Nissan LEAF can be completely recharged in seven hours on a 240V charge, and has a total range of 73 miles, based on the five-cycle tests using varying driving conditions and climate controls.

If you are interested to buy one, you will have to know that the sales of the Nissan Leaf will begin in December in California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona and Tennessee. In January 2011, the sales will also begin in Texas and Hawaii, with additional market roll-out continuing later in 2011.

Nissan Americas revealed that it was happy that the label has shown that the Nissan LEAF has continued to be the best-in-class choice, signalling the fact that it is truly a pure electric vehicle that does not use any gas, has no tailpipe, and zero emissions. This was the statement given by Scott Becker, who is the senior vice president for Finance and Administration of Nissan Americas.

The label has allowed customers to have a tool that will aid them in comparing vehicles that use alternative fuel to ones that use traditional internal combustion engine resulting in an informed purchase decision, Becker added. The Nissan LEAF was sold starting December in the states of the Arizona, California, Oregon, Tennessee, and Washington.

By 2011, sales started in Hawaii and Texas with an expected roll-out to additional markets in the later part of 2011. The company's operations in North America included automotive styling, engineering, corporate and consumer financing, manufacturing, sales and marketing, and distribution.

Press Release

EPA Rates the All-Electric, Zero-Emission, Nissan LEAF 'Best' in Class for Fuel Efficiency, Environment

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved its fuel-economy label for the 100-percent electric Nissan LEAF, rating the vehicle to be "best" in the midsize vehicle class for fuel efficiency and "best" for the environment. The new label shows a best-in-class 99 miles-per-gallon (MPG) equivalent (combined city/highway). The MPG equivalency rating was developed by the EPA as a way to provide a standard so consumers can compare vehicles across the spectrum and make an educated purchase.

The 2011 Nissan LEAF, which uses no gas, was also rated best-in-class for the environment based on emitting zero greenhouse gases or other traditional tailpipe emissions. The label, which will be part of the Nissan LEAF's Monroney label, is now ready for placement on the vehicles in anticipation of the December launch.

After completion of five-cycle testing, the EPA has rated the Nissan LEAF with an MPG equivalent of 106 city, 92 highway for a combined 99 MPGe. This calculation is based on the EPA's formula of 33.7kW-hrs being equivalent to one gallon gasoline energy. In addition, the label displays a charging time of seven hours on a 240V charge and a driving range of 73 miles, based on the five-cycle tests using varying driving conditions and climate controls. Driving range on the Nissan LEAF, as with all vehicles, varies with real-world driving conditions.

"We're pleased the label clearly demonstrates the Nissan LEAF to be a best-in-class option, reflecting that it's a pure electric vehicle, uses no gas, has no tailpipe and has zero emissions," said Scott Becker, senior vice president, Finance and Administration, Nissan Americas. "The label provides consumers with a tool to compare alternative-fuel vehicles to those with a traditional internal combustion engine and allows them to make an informed purchase decision."

Sales of the Nissan LEAF will begin in December in California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona and Tennessee. In January 2011, sales begin in Texas and Hawaii, with additional market roll-out continuing later in 2011.

In North America, Nissan's operations include automotive styling, engineering, consumer and corporate financing, sales and marketing, distribution and manufacturing. Nissan is dedicated to improving the environment under the Nissan Green Program 2010 and has been recognized as a 2010 ENERGY STAR® Partner of the Year by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

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