Audi agreed to reimburse customers for CVTs that failed

Article by Christian A., on October 11, 2013

The U.S. District Court in Los Angeles has given its final approval of the settlement of a class-action suit against Volkswagen Group of America over claims that thousands of Audi cars have defective continuously variable transmissions. Judge Beverly Reid O’Connell has approved this settlement on Sept. 25.

The final settlement, which covers around 64,000 vehicles, makes no mention of VW being guilty of any wrongdoing. The lawsuit, which was filed in January 2011, involves drivers who purchased or leased 2002-06 Audi A4s, which include Cabriolets, or A6s with factory-installed CVTs in the U.S. The original lawsuit, known as “Anna Sadowska, Yanick Godbout and Tonya DenDekker v. Volkswagen Group of America Inc., Volkswagen AG and Audi AG,” asserted that owners had to spend to repair the transmissions that failed due to manufacturing and design problems.

In addition, the suit claimed that Audi had knowledge of these problems but chose to withhold them from the consumers. While Audi denies these claims, it agreed to reimburse customers for certain repairs and costs. As the case is still open to appeal, Audi has chosen not to make any comment. Under the terms of the amended settlement, a cash reimbursement will be given to Audi drivers with certain CVT repairs taking place within 10 years or 100,000 miles, whichever occurred first, of the original sale or lease of the vehicle before June 19, 2013.

The original powertrain coverage was 4 years/50,000 miles. There are variations for the reimbursement, depending on model year. To get this reimbursement, Audi drivers are required to provide a claim form with supporting documents on or before Nov. 18.

Furthermore, Audi will extend its new-vehicle limited warranty to provide coverage for the repair or replacement of qualifying CVT parts by an authorized Audi dealer if the problem took place within 100,000 miles or 10 years from the date of the original purchase or lease. In addition, the settlement includes a trade-in reimbursement for lost value of a 2002-04 A4 or A6 that needs a replacement CVT after the normal warranty has expired but the vehicle was sold or traded without having been repaired. Nothing on the settlement documents indicates why the deal excludes 2005-06 vehicles. [source: autoblog]

Topics: audi, cvt

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