EPA rates the 2013 Tesla Model S at 95 MPGe

Article by Christian Andrei, on December 12, 2012

There are various battery packs available for the 2013 Tesla Model S electric luxury sedan. The Environmental Protection Agency has revealed that Tesla’s middle option, a 60-kWh lithium-ion battery pack, has the energy efficiency of an average 94/97 mpge (city/highway) for a combined rating of 95 mpge. The EPA said that on a single battery charge, Model S sedans with the 60-kWh battery can be driven 208 miles.

EPA’s estimates indicate that the 2013 Tesla Model S is a bit more energy efficient when it’s powered by a smaller, lighter battery pack. According to the EPA, the top-spec 85-kWh model averages 89 mpge combined and could be driven by 265 miles on a full charge.

EPA’s range estimates are very much different from Tesla’s predictions. Tesla had claimed that the two cars can be driven by 300 and 230 miles, respectively. Meanwhile, EPA reported ratings that are more conservative, of 265 miles and 208 miles respectively.

EPA has yet to test the most affordable battery pack, which had a rating of 40-kWH. The Tesla Model S doesn’t have as much power when it comes with a 60-kWh battery, which also helps improve the energy efficiency.

Tesla said that the electric motor, when coupled with the 60-kWh battery pack, offers 302 hp and it can accelerate from zero to 60mph in 5.9secs. Moving up to the 85-kWh battery offers 362 hp and allows for an acceleration time of 5.6secs.

The expensive Model S Performance version is equipped with the same battery but provides 416 hp and can accelerate from zero to 60 mph in 4.4secs. The 95 mpge rating is better than plenty other all-electric cars.

However, this is mainly because the Tesla is bigger, more potent, and more luxurious than most other EVs. The EPA said that the Ford Focus Electric can achieve 105 mpge combined. The Nissan Leaf has a rating of 99 mpge combined while the Honda Fit EV offers 118 mpge combined.

The price of the 2013 Tesla Model S has been recently raised by $2500. The starting price of a sedan with the base 40-kWh battery pack is now at $59,900 while the 60-kWh battery is priced from $69,900. The 85-kWh battery has a price tag of $79,900. On the other hand, a fully-loaded Tesla Model S Performance is priced at $94,900.

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