Europe wants to limit the top speed of vans to 120 km/h

Article by Christian A., on May 9, 2013

The European Parliament's environment committee is supporting a proposal to electronically limit the top speed of vans in the European Union to 120 km (75 miles) per hour. This plan is part of a discussion on how to reduce carbon emissions and boost the fuel efficiency of Europe's vehicles. To become law, it has to get the approval of EU member states.

According to the proposal presented last Tuesday, automakers have to install devices on all new vans that are sold in the European Union in order to limit their speed starting Jan. 1, 2014. In addition, the environment committee members voted on rules to apply a 147 grams per km (g/km) carbon dioxide emission restriction as an average for all EU new vans from 2020. The rules also seek to implement a maximum range of 105 g/km to 120 g/km starting in 2025.

German liberal politician Holger Krahmer, who has been fronting the discussion on vans in the European Parliament, is glad about the confirmation of the 147 g/km goal. However, he fought the speed limit, explaining that road traffic rules were a subject for individual member states.

The European Automobile Manufacturer's Association, which consists of automakers such as Daimler, Ford of Europe, General Motors Europe and Renault Group, said that the target of 147 g/km was very ambitious and may only be attained with hybrid vehicle technology.

In a statement, ACEA said that it is urging for "more effective" use of loopholes named supercredits, which permit manufacturers to continue building high-power, polluting vehicles if they also build very low emission vehicles like electric vans and cars.

The initial proposals from the European Commission indicated that supercredits may hasten innovation; however, if the allocation is too generous, it will weaken the effectiveness of the law to boost fuel efficiency and cut emissions. According to environmental campaigners, the 147-gram target for vans is not ambitious enough. They argue that it’s easy to achieve this via measures like lighter materials and more streamlining and that it is not even as ambitious than the proposals for cars.

Topics: europe, van

If you liked the article, share on:

Comments

Login or Create new account to add a comment!

Recommended

Just recently, it was speculated that a new Porsche Cayman GT4 RS is coming. There is no official confirmation yet from the German sports car maker, but the arrival of...
by - February 18, 2017
Will there be a BMW M4 CS? Apparently, there is a Club Sport version of the BMWM4 after it was sighted in California doing a shoot for a new commercial...
by - February 18, 2017
Having a 400 hp and 470 lb-ft of torque is a tremendous advantage. Yet Ford hasn’t formally announced the numbers regarding its latest Ford Expedition. The current SUV as we...
by - February 17, 2017
Aston Martin and Red Bull’s AM-RB 001 hypercar project is moving along quickly. This time, the project partners have already commissioned a number of technical partners that would help in...
by - February 17, 2017
This is what happens when a guy thinks fast forward into the future. Never mind if autonomous driving is just lurking around the corner. Volkswagen, Chevrolet, Audi and Ford are...
by - February 17, 2017
Facebook

Youtube Channel

Tip Us
Do you have a tip for us?
Did you film an important event?
Contact us
Newsletter
Subscribe to our newsletter!
Subscribe
Galleries