Ford enters ‘advanced engineering’ phase of work on self-driving technology

Article by Christian Andrei, on June 26, 2015

Ford Motor is now on the second phase of its work on autonomous technology – the advanced engineering program. The automaker has recently concluded the first phase, which is the research effort. Ford had formed a global team for this project led by Randy Visintainer, who has been with the brand for 29 years.

No timeframe has been revealed on when the autonomous vehicles will be rolled out. However, Ford’s lineup within the next five years will be available with driver-assist features that are included in the steps to achieve a self-driving vehicle.

During a media event, Raj Nair, Ford’s group vice president for global product development, said that testing is already being done on autonomous vehicles and that production and sales of vehicles that are semi-autonomous have already begun.

Nair added that by next year in the U.S., Ford will start to sell a vehicle with technology that helps avoid bumping into pedestrians. The Ford Mondeo that’s available in Europe already has this feature. In a statement, the automaker said that this technology will appear on most of its products by 2019.

According to Ford CEO Mark Fields, the company is hoping to offer affordable, mass-market autonomous vehicles but it isn’t working to necessarily be the first to use this technology. He believes that by the end of this decade, autonomous vehicles will be introduced.

What entering the second phase actually means is that the automaker is testing and refining its algorithms as well as preparing the sensing and computing technology for production. Creating a vehicle program from this technology comprises the final phase.

Visintainer held the position as Ford’s director of product development quality. He also worked in various capacities in the advanced engineering group. Visintainer and his team are based in Dearborn. The team also consists of members in different sites worldwide such as Germany and the newly opened Palo Alto, Calif., research center.

Cameras have a big role in Ford’s driver-assist technologies, which will soon be more widely offered in the upcoming years.

By 2018, the rearview cameras will be standard equipment on its North American light passenger vehicles. By 2020, front cameras will be on most vehicles worldwide. Presently, rearview cameras are standard on 19 Ford models for sale in North America.

If you liked the article, share on:

Comments

Login or Create new account to add a comment!

Recommended

In Japan, Toyota stays in the limelight by always cooking up something new for its famous 86 sports car. A colour orange Toyota 86 performance edition is one that’s hard...
by - December 4, 2016
Back in 2009, Nissan first introduced the Nissan Leaf, the company’s first all-electric vehicle. LEAF stands for Leading Environmentally-friendly Affordable Family car and this particular EV has been considered as...
by - December 3, 2016
In the minivan segment, the 2017 Chrysler Pacifica is already impressive in terms of fuel economy figures – as rated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. In fact, the...
by - December 2, 2016
Having a blacked-out Bentley Mulsanne Speed is already menacing by itself but by naming it as the Bamford X, it became all the more imposing. This model was made by...
by - December 2, 2016
We have good news for those who are waiting for the latest version of the Mazda CX-5 compact crossover. It was just unveiled in November at the 2016 Los Angeles...
by - December 2, 2016
Facebook

Youtube Channel

Tip Us
Do you have a tip for us?
Did you film an important event?
Contact us
Newsletter
Subscribe to our newsletter!
Subscribe
Galleries