GM to recycle oil-soaked plastic booms into parts for Chevolet Volt

Article by Christian Andrei, on December 21, 2010

To lessen the environmental impact of the oil spilled at the Gulf of Mexico, General Motors has come up with an innovative method to convert the oil-soaked plastic boom material into 100,000 pounds of plastic resin that will be used for its brand new Chevrolet Volt.

For this project, GM has teamed up with Heritage Environmental, which will gather the boom material, as well as with Mobile Fluid Recovery, Lucent Polymers and GDC Inc. This move saves the waste that would have filled the country's landfills.

GM said that around 100 miles of the material collected from Alabama and Louisiana coasts will be converted into plastic that will be used for the vehicle’s components, which are made of 25% boom material and 25% recycled tires from GM's Mildford Proving Ground vehicle test facility. 

Mike Robinson, GM vice president of Environment, Energy and Safety policy, said that under GM’s overall strategy, “creative recycling” is just one way to reduce the environmental impact. GM reuses and recycles material by-products at its 76 landfill-free facilities everyday. Robinson describes this as “a good example” of utilizing this capability and applying it to a greater magnitude.

"This was purely a matter of helping out,” said John Bradburn, manager of GM’s waste-reduction efforts. “If sent to a landfill, these materials would have taken hundreds of years to begin to break down, and we didn’t want to see the spill further impact the environment. We knew we could identify a beneficial reuse of this material given our experience.”

Press Release

Chevrolet Volt Components Created from Gulf of Mexico Oil-Soaked Booms

Oil-soaked plastic boom material used to soak up oil in the Gulf of Mexico is finding new life as auto parts in the Chevrolet Volt.

General Motors has developed a method to convert an estimated 100 miles of the material

off the Alabama and Louisiana coasts and keep it out of the nation's landfills. The ongoing project is expected to create enough plastic under hood parts to supply the first year production of the extended-range electric vehicle.

"Creative recycling is one extension of GM's overall strategy to reduce its environmental impact," said Mike Robinson, GM vice president of Environment, Energy and Safety policy. "We reuse and recycle material by-products at our 76 landfill-free facilities every day. This is a good example of using this expertise and applying it to a greater magnitude."

Recycling the booms will result in the production of more than 100,000 pounds of plastic resin for the vehicle components, eliminating an equal amount of waste that would otherwise have been incinerated or sent to landfills.

The parts, which deflect air around the vehicle's radiator, are comprised of 25 percent boom material and 25 percent recycled tires from GM's Milford Proving Ground vehicle test facility. The remaining is a mixture of post-consumer recycled plastics and other polymers.

GM worked with several partners throughout the recovery and development processes. Heritage Environmental managed the collection of boom material along the Louisiana coast. Mobile Fluid Recovery stepped in next, using a massive high-speed drum that spun the booms until dry and eliminated all the absorbed oil and wastewater. Lucent Polymers used its process to then manipulate the material into the physical state necessary for plastic die-mold production. Tier-one supplier, GDC Inc., used its patented EndurapreneTM material process to combine the resin with other plastic compounds to produce the components.

The work in the Gulf is expected to last at least two more months and GM will continue to assist suppliers in collecting booms until the need no longer exists. The automaker anticipates enough material will be gathered that it can be used as components in other Chevrolet models.

The world's first electric vehicle with extended range, the Chevy Volt was recently awarded Green Car of the Year by Green Car Journal.

GM is dedicated to reducing its waste and pollutants, and recycles materials at every state of the product lifecycle. It uses recycled and renewable materials in its cars and trucks, which are at least 85 percent recyclable. Used tires, old plastic bottles, denim and nylon carpet are all redirected from landfills and reused in select GM vehicles.

GM facilities worldwide recycle 90 percent of the waste they generate. The automaker recently announced more than half of its worldwide facilities are now landfill-free – all manufacturing waste is recycled or used to create energy.

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