Hyundai pledges for Automatic Emergency Braking to be standard equipment on all vehicles by 2022

Article by Christian Andrei, on March 22, 2016

Hyundai Motor America has expressed its voluntary commitment to ensure that all new cars it releases by 2022 will come with the Automatic Emergency Braking as standard. This commitment coincides with the 2022 reporting year of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

The company has long supported having standardized safety technologies in cars. Working with the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), the NHTSA, and the auto industry in general, the company hopes to have AEB as standard equipment on all future cars.

Hyundai Motor America Vice-President for Corporate and Product Planning Mike O’Brien talked about how important it is for customers to be given effective safety technologies.

With a number of new models, the company will be bringing in new standards for safety especially with technologies that have been shown to be effective not only when it comes to preventing accidents but also in reducing the injuries incurred if an accident happens, he continued.

At present, there are six models that have the AEB as an option. These are the 2017 model year units which include the 2017 Elantra, 2017 Santa Fe, 2017 Santa Fe Sport, and the 2016 models which are the 2016 Sonata, 2016 Tucson and 2016 Genesis.

During the latter part of 2016, the company disclosed that all of its 2017 model-year vehicles will not have the AEB as standard. The AEB is a system that makes use of forward-facing radar and a camera. With the addition of a sensor, the AEB detects if there is a pedestrian or a vehicle and notifies the driver of a possible collision. If the driver is unable to immediately react to the situation, the system then applies the emergency brakes.

This system is the reason why the Genesis, Tucson and Sonata models have been rated by the IIHS as TOP SAFETY PICK+. It was in 2003 when Hyundai first worked on having safety features standardized. Back then, it included a side airbag protection as standard for its then line-up.

Hyundai thus became the first non-luxury brand to get passive safety technology at this level. When the company launched the Tucson by 2004, it became the first-ever SUV below $20,000 to have the Electronic Stability Control and six airbags as a standard feature. Then Hyundai revealed the 2006 Sonata. The 2006 Sonata became the first, and so far the only, mid-size sedan to come with the Electronic Stability Control as standard.

Press Release


Hyundai Motor America, a strong advocate for standardizing effective safety technologies, praises the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) and the automotive industry for working together to make Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB) a standard feature on new cars in the future. The group, in which Hyundai was pleased to participate, has developed a voluntary commitment to make AEB standard on all new cars no later than NHTSA’s 2022 reporting year.

“Providing effective safety technology is essential for our customers,” said Mike O’Brien, vice president, corporate and product planning, Hyundai Motor America. “With all our new models, we are ushering in new standards for safety, featuring technology proven most effective in preventing accidents in the first place, and reducing injuries should an accident occur.”

Six models are available today with AEB as optional equipment: the all-new 2017 Elantra, 2017 Santa Fe, 2017 Santa Fe Sport, 2016 Sonata, 2016 Tucson and 2016 Genesis. Coming this summer to dealerships, the Genesis G90 will feature standard AEB. Later in 2016, additional 2017 model-year Hyundai vehicles will include AEB as available equipment.

AEB uses both the forward-facing radar and camera, through sensor fusion, to detect a vehicle or pedestrian, and warns the driver of a potential collision. If the driver does not react to avoid the impact, the system will apply emergency braking. The Hyundai Genesis, Tucson and Sonata models are also TOP SAFETY PICK+ rated by IIHS.

Building a Tradition of Safety Leadership
Standardizing key safety features at Hyundai began with the application of standard side airbag protection across the Hyundai lineup in 2003 -- making it the first non-luxury brand to achieve this level of passive safety technology. In 2004, Hyundai introduced the Tucson, the first under-$20,000 SUV, with standard Electronic Stability Control and six standard airbags. And when Hyundai introduced the 2006 Sonata, it became industry's first and only mid-size sedan with standard Electronic Stability Control.

Hyundai Motor America, headquartered in Fountain Valley, Calif., is a subsidiary of Hyundai Motor Co. of Korea. Hyundai vehicles are distributed throughout the United States by Hyundai Motor America and are sold and serviced through more than 830 dealerships nationwide. All Hyundai vehicles sold in the U.S. are covered by the Hyundai Assurance program, which includes the 5-year/60,000-mile fully transferable new vehicle limited warranty, Hyundai’s 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain limited warranty and five years of complimentary Roadside Assistance. Hyundai Blue Link Connected Care provides owners of Hyundai models equipped with the Blue Link telematics system with proactive safety and car care services complimentary for one year with enrollment. These services include Automatic Collision Notification, Enhanced Roadside Assistance, Vehicle Diagnostic Alert, Monthly Vehicle Health Report and In-Vehicle Service Scheduling.

Topics: hyundai, safety

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