Lexus working on a new supercar

Article by Christian A., on April 12, 2012

Lexus is currently developing an LFA II, according to a senior Toyota executive who asked to remain anonymous. Its predecessor, the Lexus LFA, became very successful despite having a price tag of $375,000. Many criticized the LFA because its cost appeared to be highly excessive when compared to its rivals.

For example, a Ferrari 458 Italia costs $225,000 while the Nissan GT-R is priced at $90,000. But the 500 units of the LFA, Japan’s first ever supercar, sold quickly as buyers had paid for its exclusivity too. It’s believed that the LFA II would be even more outstanding when it comes to performance. It would also cost much higher.

A source said that this new supercar is twice the car with a performance level that’s much higher. It’s expected to be priced with a range of $800,000 to $1,000,000. Only 100 units of the LFA will be made, making it even more exclusive and more appealing.

The new Lexus LFA exemplifies a historic moment for Lexus and for supercar development. It was created truly from a clean slate. The Lexus LFA was made by a small, ardent, and devoted team of engineers who pushed technological boundaries in at each stage in materials and engineering to build a Lexus like no other.

Built with advanced carbon fibre technology, a bespoke, high-revving 552bhp 4.8-litre naturally aspirated V10 engine is matched to a rear-mounted six-speed sequential automatic transmission, powering the rear-wheel drive Lexus LFA with 200mph-plus performance. Undoubtedly a thoroughbred supercar, the LFA is engineered for a single goal, delivering the ultimate driving experience. For the past ten years, Lexus has pushed every boundary pursuing this goal, and it now believes it has created the most driver-focused car possible.

CARBON FIBRE CONSTRUCTION

Making sure the car weighed as little as possible defined the Lexus LFA’s development and led to switching from an aluminium construction to using advanced Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) for the chassis and body.

Lexus also decided to build the CFRP structure in-house, and not through a third-party. This draws on Toyota Motor Corporation's tradition of textile weaving technology pushing the limits of its technical abilities. They developed new carbon fibre looms and a laser system to monitor the material’s integrity.

Topics: lexus, supercar

If you liked the article, share on:

Comments

Recommended

In September 27, 2016, Porsche initially filed for a patent that is the “Unique Active Rear Diffuser”. And earlier this week, on April 27, 2017, the United States Patent and...
by - April 29, 2017
The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) has given its Top Safety Pick+ award to the redesigned version of the 2017 Kia Cadenza. This was a result of excellent a...
by - April 29, 2017
It’s pretty neat if you possess something of an extraordinary breed like, say, the Pagani Huayra. There are after all just a total of 100 units ever been built by...
by - April 28, 2017
If you’ve ever visited an arcade, chances are you have already seen a Logitech G920 wheel. If that doesn’t ring a bell, it’s the steering wheel that you use when...
by - April 28, 2017
Toyota Motor Corporation disclosed that it will be bringing two of its Mirai fuel cell vehicles to China by October of this year. Tests will then be conducted on these...
by - April 28, 2017
Facebook

Youtube Channel

Tip Us
Do you have a tip for us?
Did you film an important event?
Contact us
Newsletter
Subscribe to our newsletter!
Subscribe
Galleries