Mephistopheles shows up at the 2011 Goodwood Festival of Speed

Article by Christian Andrei, on June 29, 2011

The Goodwood Festival of Speed has something to interest the history buffs: the Mephistopheles, the one-of-a-kind powerful, massive record-breaking car from 1923 that was assembled by Sir Ernest Eldridge.

The Mephistopheles is based on a 1908 Fiat SB4 Corsa and is powered by a WW1 Fiat A12 aircraft engine (the A-12 Bis). The Mephistopheles is set to go up the Goodwood Hill twice a day over the weekend of the Festival of Speed.

It is part of a batch named ‘Pioneering Giants’ and it will be put on display in the Cathedral Paddock.

Eldridge had adjusted the car by lengthening its chassis (the wheelbase was extended to 11ft 5 1/8thins) with the use of parts from a London bus. It is powered by an aircraft engine that had been converted to offer 320hp.

Mephistopheles is named as such because it emitted puffs of smoke when it got the world land speed record. On July 12, 1924, it achieved a speed of 234.97km/h (146.01mph).

The Mephistopheles had been a part of Fiat’s historical collection since 1969. Since then, it had undergone a lengthy and intensive restoration process.

More than a century ago in 1908, Fiat unveiled the SB4, a chain-driven racing car created to compete in the Grand Prix. While in a race, the SB4 caught the attention of Sir Ernest Eldridge, who eventually acquired it to transform it into a vehicle that could break speed records.

One of the first things that Sir Eldridge did was to replace the already powerful 18-liter engine of the SB4 with 21.7-liter six-cylinder Type A-12 Bis, a liquid-cooled powerplant designed for an airplane that could develop up to 320 hp at a just 1,800 rpm. While this Fiat A12 aircraft engine from the First World War was very potent, it was also very long and very heavy. This is why Sir Eldridge had to expand the chassis of the SB4 employing components from a London bus.

This effectively lengthened the wheelbase of the SB4 to 11 feet 5.124 inches. Once fitted, the engine sends power to the rear wheels through a chain. Braking is taken care of by a hand brake for the rear wheels. Baptized as Mefistofele (Mephistopheles) – in reference to the bangs and smokes produced by the 21.7-liter engine – the modified SB4 racer made history on July 12, 1924 by cruising at a top speed of 234.980 km/h (146 mph) in Arpajon, France thereby setting a new world land speed record.

While the record was broken just after 32 days, this was the last that was set on public roads. Decades later in 1969, Fiat's Giovanni Agnelli acquired the Mefistofele from the heirs of Sir Eldridge, had it fully restored and made a part of the carmaker’s historic collection.

Presently, the Mefistofele is housed in the Centro Storico Fiat in Turin. Now, the Mefistofele will find its way on the road once more as it takes part in the 2011 Goodwood Festival of Speed. It will challenge the Goodwood Hill twice a day during the weekend. Part of the batch called 'Pioneering Giants,' Mefistofele will also be displayed in the Cathedral Paddock.

Press Release

MEPHISTOPHELES TAKES TO THE HILL AT GOODWOOD

Mephistopheles, the powerful, giant record-breaking car from 1923, is to put its pace to good use again this weekend at the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

The monster car, built by Sir Ernest Eldridge on the base of a 1908 Fiat SB4 Corsa and powered by a WW1 Fiat A12 aircraft engine (the A-12 Bis), is the only one of its kind in the world, and will be going up the Goodwood Hill twice a day over the Festival of Speed weekend.

Part of a group of big racers, it’s in a batch called, ‘Pioneering Giants’ and will also be on display in the Cathedral Paddock.

Eldridge modified the car by lengthening the chassis (the wheelbase was lengthened to 11ft 5 1/8thins), using parts derived from a London bus, and adding the aircraft engine converted to deliver 320 HP. On 12 July 1924, Mephistopheles – so called due to the bangs and puffs of smoke that it emitted when capturing the world land speed record – reached the extraordinary figure of 234.97km/h (146.01mph).

Since 1969 it has belonged to Fiat’s historical collection, and recently underwent a long and intensive process of restoration.

If you liked the article, share on:

Comments

Login or Create new account to add a comment!

Recommended

Hyundai is making the green vehicle race more competitive by offering three powertrain types -- pure electric (EV), hybrid (EV plus combustion engine) and plug-in hybrid (PHEV) – in one...
by - December 9, 2016
Although specs for the new Renault Megane had already surfaced several weeks ago, we didn’t know that the company has cooked up something new. Aside from the 200hp gasoline, Renault‘s...
by - December 9, 2016
For the first time in fifty-eight years, Infiniti registers its first US-Spec Q60 Coupe in Cuba. American products have not been allowed entry into Cuba for six decades. But it...
by - December 9, 2016
Chevrolet has already given out the pricing for some of its 2018 Equinox models. Not only will the new Equinox be available in both the US and Canada, it is...
by - December 9, 2016
Nearly all details have been set with regards to the upcoming market introduction of the new Jaguar I-Pace. Its production version was recently previewed at the 2016 Los Angeles Auto...
by - December 8, 2016
Facebook

Youtube Channel

Tip Us
Do you have a tip for us?
Did you film an important event?
Contact us
Newsletter
Subscribe to our newsletter!
Subscribe
Galleries