Volvo planning to launch a four-cylinder diesel engine later this year

Article by Christian Andrei, on April 12, 2013

Volvo revealed that a high-tech direct-injection system will be used on a soon-to-be-launched next-generation diesel engine to significantly cut down on its fuel consumption. The i-ART technology features individual fuel-pressure sensor on every fuel injector, permitting the engine computer to be more precise at dispensing fuel to every cylinder.

Volvo said that the new i-ART sensor and diesel fuel rail will permit adjustments to combustion in every separate individual cylinder. Contemporary diesel engines come with a single fuel-pressure sensor that controls all of the cylinders. Volvo said that this allows for more reliable cylinder pressures and improved power. In addition, Volvo claims that the direct injection system in its next-generation engines will run at 36,259 psi, higher than majority of the current diesels.

Volvo said that overall, the i-ART is the second step in the diesel revolution and boosts the efficiency as well as its power output. This system will be used in the first Volvo Environmental Architecture (VEA) engines that are set to launch this fall. We first learned about the VEA in 2011.

It is comprised of four-cylinder gas and diesel engines. At launch, they will feature eight-speed automatic transmissions. Several will be turbocharged while others could make use of electric or flywheel hybrids. This new range of engines will enable Volvo to terminate five-, six-, and even eight-cylinder engines, meeting the company’s aim to eventually offer cars just with four cylinders.

In a statement, Volvo powertrain engineering vice president Derek Crabb said that the automaker will make smaller, more intelligent engines that have so much power that they will “turn V8s into dinosaurs.” It’s not certain yet just in which models the VEA engines are set to debut.

Volvo said that by 2014, the brand intends to launch new models on its Scalable Platform Architecture, which is flexible and considerably ighter than the existing Volvo chassis. To significantly cut fuel consumptions, cars will use both SPA and VEA, just like Mazda’s SkyActiv engines and chassis.

If you liked the article, share on:

Comments

Login or Create new account to add a comment!

Recommended

The 2018 model year could be an exciting year for fans and enthusiasts of the Chevrolet Corvette. This comes as the 2018 version of the Corvette is bound to feature...
by - January 19, 2017
As if seeing the future more than a decade from now, one of the top scientists in the world of robotics and automations is predicting that children born today won’t...
by - January 19, 2017
Ford has just recently unveiled the 2018 Ford Mustang, and as it turned out, the carmaker gave its beloved pony car a facelift. There have been mixed reactions about the...
by - January 19, 2017
The bidding war for one of the only 20 examples -- 21 actually, but the 00 version went to a museum -- of the classically beautiful Lamborghini Reventon built and...
by - January 18, 2017
Bentley once again confirmed its plans to push PHEV into their future lineups. As a matter of fact, the Bentayga SUV will be the first to have the plugin hybrid...
by - January 18, 2017
Facebook

Youtube Channel

Tip Us
Do you have a tip for us?
Did you film an important event?
Contact us
Newsletter
Subscribe to our newsletter!
Subscribe
Galleries