epa

List of News and Information about epa on 4WheelsNews.com

News and Information about epa

Read the latest news and information about epa published on 4WheelsNews.com! View comments and pictures about epa on 4WheelsNews.com!

You also might be interested: karma revero, epa rating, fuel consumption, bugatti, bugatti chiron, ford, ford gt, supercar, dodge, dodge challenger, awd, muscle car, chrysler, chrysler pacifica, minivan

EPA says 2018 Karma Revero offers much lower range and economy than company claims

When Karma Automotive announced the new 2018 Karma Revero plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), the company made its Fisker Karma-inspired creation look highly appealing -- not just in terms of looks and performance, but also when it comes to fuel economy and all-electric range.

It turns out that the actual fuel economy and range of the 2018 Karma Revero PHEV are not quite at par with what was promised according to the official fuel economy figures from United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

As a plug-in hybrid EV, the new Karma Revero employs an electric motor-gasoline engine drive setup. According to Karma, the 2018 Karma Revero could be driven for up to 50 miles of pure-electric range, with its lithium-ion battery pack sending power to its dual electric motors. As the carmaker states in its brochure, motorists who drive less than 50 miles per trip may never have to buy gasoline again. For longer trips exceeding 50 miles, the gasoline engine kicks in once the battery power reaches zero. This brings the total range of the Revero to around 300 miles. All of these figures were advertised by Karma for the new 2018 Revero PHEV.

Read the entire article EPA says 2018 Karma Revero offers much lower range and economy than company claims

Bugatti Chiron rated by EPA, do not expect an impressive fuel consumption

There is no disputing that the Bugatti Chiron is a beautiful monster. Much-awaited and much-hyped, this hypercar was described by Bugatti as the most powerful, fastest, most luxurious and most exclusive production super sports car in the world, beating its likewise monstrous stable mate, the Bugatti Veyron. However, there is also one aspect that the Chiron is better at than the Veyron 16.4 – its fuel economy.

Yes, while the Chiron is over 50 percent more powerful than the Veyron -- their quad-turbo, 8.0-liter W16 engine producing outputs of 1,500 hp and 987 hp respectively, it nonetheless travels more miles per gallon on the combined cycle. That means the Chiron essentially consumes less fuel when on the go. Letting numbers do the talking, the Bugatti Chiron has been rated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to deliver 11 mpg on the combined cycle. This means that on the combined cycle, the Chiron has a better fuel economy than the Veyron, which is rated at 10 mpg.

In terms of highway fuel economy, the Veyron is slightly better than the Chiron. A gallon of fuel allows the Veyron to travel 15 miles and the Chiron for 14 miles – on the highway. On the other hand, the Chiron has better fuel economy on the city than the Veyron. The Chiron has been EPA-rated to return 9 mpg on the city, while the Veyron was estimated to be able to travel 8 miles on a gallon of fuel.

Read the entire article Bugatti Chiron rated by EPA, do not expect an impressive fuel consumption

US EPA releases fuel economy ratings for 2017 Ford GT

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has officially released the fuel economy ratings of the 2017 Ford GT. According to the EPA, the 2017 Ford GT has a fuel economy rating of 11 mpg for city and 18 mpg for highway. Combined fuel economy rating meanwhile is measured at 14 mpg.

The figures reveal that owners will be expected to spend an additional $2,850 per year in fuel costs. For a 5-year spread, owners are likely to spend as much as $8,000. Though this may appear to be an added cost, given that the 2017 Ford GT has MSRP at $400,000, it may appear to be a paltry sum. According to various estimates, it will also mean owners will have to spend an additional $3,000 for the Gas Guzzler Tax.

However, many enthusiasts consider these figures to be rather dismal. Even if the previous generation of the GT did not have good figures as well, it continues to be better than the new model. Fuel economy rating for prior GT is at 12 mpg with highway at 19 mpg. Combined rating though is the same at 14 mpg.

Read the entire article US EPA releases fuel economy ratings for 2017 Ford GT

EPA confirms all-wheel drive Dodge Challenger GT for 2017 model year

There have been rumors circulating that FCA will offer an all-wheel drive version of the new Dodge Challenger. FCA has yet to officially confirm whether such a version of the Dodge Challenger will be up for grabs in the near future. But it seems it will be.

However, FCA wasn’t the one that made the confirmation. Instead, the United States Environmental Protection Agency – through its Web site – has confirmed that there will be an all-wheel drive Dodge Challenger GT for the 2017 model year. Although the EPA Web site doesn’t actually specify that the new 2017 Challenger GT is the all-wheel drive model on the main page of the listing, the specs page for the vehicle clearly states that this Dodge offering is an all-wheel drive.

Having an all-wheel drive 2017 Dodge Challenger GT listed at EPA’s Web site is the next true thing to official unveiling. The list covers all cars that will be sold to the general public. In addition, the Dodge Challenger GT all-wheel drive model is listed as one of the options for the 2017 model year, which means that there is huge chance that this version is a real thing.

Read the entire article EPA confirms all-wheel drive Dodge Challenger GT for 2017 model year

Buyers looking for excellent fuel efficiency need not look further than the all-new 2017 Chrysler Pacifica minivan. With a highway-cycle fuel-economy rating of 28 miles per gallon given by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the all-new 2017 Chrysler Pacifica is 12 percent more efficient than the model it replaces and it now holds the record for fuel efficiency in the minivan category.

In addition, the new Chrysler minivan was found to be nine percent greener than the previous model. FCA Product Development COO and Head of Product Portfolio Management for FCA’s Group Executive Council Mark Chernoby explains that the new Pacifica isn’t just engineered for today’s enjoyment but is designed and crafted with the welfare of its customers many years down the road.

This is why, the company created one of the cleanest vehicles in its category. The new minivan’s nine percent improvement compared to the previous model is based on its Global Warming Potential (GWP), an industry-adopted means to gauge the all-inclusive environmental impact of a vehicle from its production, to its delivery, and eventually to its fuel consumption figures while being used.

Read the entire article 2017 Chrysler Pacifica offers fuel economy rating of 28 mpg highway, 22 mpg combined

To compensate for cheating on its emission tests, Volkswagen was recently asked by US regulators to develop electric vehicles (EV). Accordingly, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) asked the car maker to produce charging stations for EVs at its Chattanooga, Tennessee production plant.

Volkswagen has already come up with a few vehicles featuring electric or hybrid motors. However, the report from Welt am Sonntag did not specify if the agency was asking Volkswagen to build new or existing models. Presently, the EPA and Volkswagen are in talks to come up with an agreement to fix the diesel engines that exceeds the emission limits set by the US standards.

Volkswagen still has not resolved the emission issues of nearly 600,000 diesel vehicles in the US five months after the scandal was revealed to the public. According to a Volkswagen spokesman, negotiations with the EPA are still ongoing but the company will not yet disclose the contents of the talks.

Read the entire article US EPA to Volkswagen: Build EV Charging Stations

The United States Environmental Protection Agency has issued updated procedures for determining fuel economy of vehicles – a challenging part for some carmakers in the last two years. EPA’s update covers how carmakers should calculate road load values in coast down tests, which gauges the rolling resistance and aerodynamic drag of a vehicle as it goes from 70 mph to a stop on a straight, flat track.

These values are usually used to program dynamometers that carmakers could use to calculate fuel economy ratings using the EPA’s test cycle. The update clarifies how carmakers should get vehicles ready for coast down testing and revises the test to monitor road load levels over a broader range of speed during the test.

According to Chris Grundler, director of the EPA’s Office of Transportation Air Quality, the updates will help ensure the fuel economy labels are accurate, and will help clarify how the agency expects the tests to be done.

Read the entire article EPA updates procedures for determining mpg numbers of vehicles

The United States Environmental Protection Agency is getting ready to further stiffen its oversight of mpg testing and reporting this year as it bid to make fuel economy ratings much closer to what drivers could experience in real-world driving.

EPA will particularly focus on its "coast-down" test, which has been tagged as the source of mistakes that have prompted carmakers like Hyundai, Kia, Ford and Mercedes-Benz to restate the sticker ratings of a number of models since 2012.

The test entails having vehicles coast to a stop from 80 mph, which generate readings on aerodynamic drag and friction in the drivetrain, as well as other data points. EPA will use the data gathered to program dynamometers to simulate a vehicle's behavior on real roads during laboratory testing.

Read the entire article EPA to stiffen oversight of mpg testing and reporting

Carmakers are leaning to see a proposal requiring them to road test vehicles to verify mileage claims. The US Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to require car makers to perform "supplemental test track audits" of light vehicles, along with laboratory testing. The proposal came following recent restatement of EPA ratings on several vehicles by Hyundai, Kia and Ford.

Carmakers, however, are unclear on how such tests should be conducted since variables wind speed, temperature and pavement conditions should also be factored. AutoPacific analyst Dave Sullivan remarked that “more realistic and more real-world testing" is a good idea, but noted that he is not sure “what implementation will be like."

According to The Wall Street Journal, the proposal would make real-world driving trials more rigorous and reflect air resistance and rolling friction on a test track rather than in a test lab -- factors that could affect fuel economy considerably.

Read the entire article Carmakers favor EPA proposal for real-world mpg testing

The United States Environmental Protection Agency wants carmakers to road test their vehicles to verify mileage claims indicated on window sticker prices, according to a report by The Wall Street Journal, citing EPA officials. EPA’s proposal came as it restated mileage ratings on several cars and light trucks built by Hyundai, Kia and Ford.

The move is also part of a wider effort to more carefully scrutinize mpg figures published and claimed by carmakers. The agency has been receiving consumer complaints over the difference between a driver’s actual mileage and a vehicle’s mpg rating.

Chris Grundler, director of the EPA’s Office of Transportation and Air Quality, told The Journal that while some carmakers are already road-testing their vehicles to verify its mpg rating, the agency is establishing a regulatory requirement for all automakers.

Read the entire article US EPA wants carmakers to road test their models to verify mpg claims

Carmakers were able to achieve the goals set by the United States government for the first year of new fuel economy standards, save for Jaguar Land Rover. The carmakers were able to get enough credits, as issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency, to comply with obligations through the 2012 model year, according to an EPA analysis.

The new EPA standards, which measure tailpipe emissions, run parallel to corporate average fuel economy standards that require cars and light-duty trucks to an average of 54.5 mpg by 2025. Carmakers like Toyota, Honda, Ford, General Motors and a number of smaller ones built fleets light vehicle that were fuel efficient enough to comply with the first year of the new EPA standards.

On the other hand, Chrysler Group and Daimler AG were able to get enough credits by acquiring them from their rivals. BMW, Nissan and Volkswagen, meanwhile, carried over credits from prior years to meet the standards.

Read the entire article Most carmakers met first year of new EPA fuel economy standards

The United States Environmental Protection Agency is preparing this fall to release to the public an audit of carmakers’ fuel economy claims.  Christopher Grundler, head of the EPA's Office of Transportation and Air Quality, told Automotive News in an interview last week that the results of industry-wide audits included tests on over 20 car and light-truck models this year.

The audits were done at tracks in Arizona and Michigan and were intended double-check carmakers' readings on the "coast-down" test, which turned up problems with the mpg figures on several Hyundai and Kia's window stickers in 2012. Grundler said he can't comment on the EPA findings until he talks to his bosses and briefs executives from carmakers.  He, however, said that the report "will be very interesting to some people."

The coast-down test involves speeding a vehicle to around 80 mph and then allowing it to glide to a stop. This process measures the aerodynamics of a vehicle, the rolling resistance of its tires and the amount of friction in its drivetrain.  The measurements are used to program a dynamometer to run the vehicle through the EPA's test cycles and come up with mpg estimates. 

Read the entire article EPA to release audit of vehicle mpg numbers this fall

The United States Environmental Protection Agency has a message for those saying and complaining that its fuel economy tests couldn't reliably measure the performance of hybrid vehicles -- don't blame the test. EPA's message came as Ford Motor Co. decided to restate fuel economy estimates on its C-Max Hybrid.  The matter was raised after Consumer Reports claimed that half the hybrids it tested fell short of their advertised mpg numbers by 10 percent or more.

Ford jumped on the issue, saying that it would help the EPA determine figure out whether its tests were inflating the fuel economy estimates for several hybrids. Christopher Grundler, EPA's top auto industry regulator, said the matter was enough to make its own engineers question the accuracy of their tests. The engineers got some reassurance after EPA had Toyota Prius and Hyundai Sonata hybrids underwent the same safety tests that faltered Ford C-Max.

The results? The other hybrids did fine on the tests. "It was all quite reassuring," Grundler told Automotive News, adding that the problem is "really not how the testing is done." Ford, however, is contented with EPA's move, saying that there is an industry-wide issue with hybrid vehicles. 

Read the entire article EPA says fuel economy tests hold up for hybrids

Ford Motor Co. disclosed that the United States Environmental Protection Agency may modify its procedures for testing the mileage of hybrid vehicles. Raj Nair, Ford's product development chief, noted at the Deutsche Bank Global Auto Industry Conference in Detroit that following tests by Consumer Reports magazine, a number of Toyota Motor Corp.'s Prius hybrid models exhibited higher fuel-economy deficits against EPA estimates than the Ford Fusion hybrid and C-Max hybrid.

Nair remarked that the shortfalls reflected a lot of differences against the EPA label for all carmakers. He said that several factors like speed and outside temperature could influence the differences in actual fuel economy compared with EPA ratings.

The Ford Fusion hybrid and C-Max hybrid promised to deliver 47 miles (76 kilometers) per gallon, but during tests conducted by Consumer Reports, the models’ ratings dropped 17 percent to 21 percent, according to a statement by the magazine in December 2012. According to Consumer Reports, its tests showed that the Ford Fusion hybrid achieved 39 mpg, while the C- Max hybrid averaged 37 mpg in both city and highway driving.

Read the entire article Ford says US EPA may change mpg-testing procedures for hybrids

The Environmental Protection Agency said that the 2013 Land Rover LR2 with the downsized 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine offers improved fuel economy. In city driving, the 2013 Land Rover LR2 returns 17 mpg while on the highway, it offers 24 mpg. In comparison, the EPA has determined that the 2012 LR2 returns 15 mpg in city driving and 22 mpg on the highway.

2013 LR2 displays a 13% boost in city driving and about 9% better on the highway. One of the primary worries about the outgoing LR2 was its low fuel economy. When the 2013 LR2 with the new engine debuted, Land Rover had not given a fuel economy estimate. Many had been waiting for the EPA to release the most vital information about its redesign.

LR2 is now powered by a new 240-horsepower turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine, which replaces the former 3.2-liter inline six-cylinder engine. Even with the improvement, the LR2 still trails several of its rivals, such as the 2013 Audi Q5 and BMW X3 xDrive 28i, when it comes to fuel economy. The EPA said that the 2013 Audi Q5 with a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine offers 20 mpg in city driving and 28 mpg on the highway.

Read the entire article 2013 Land Rover LR2 now more fuel-efficient, according to EPA

There will be a change in the leadership of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency with the departure of its chief Lisa Jackson from her post after nearly four years. Jackson has been one of the major players in raising the federal fuel-efficiency standards to 54.5 mpg by 2025. She has also been in a dispute with Republicans who opposed the environmental regulations that she proposed.

Jackson also led the agency to declare carbon dioxide as a pollutant that may be regulated under the Clean Air Act. This allowed the EPA to create a new regulatory regime to reduced carbon emissions. President Barack Obama released a statement to thank Jackson for her service and to applaud her work on mercury pollution limits, her battle against climate change and helping establish new fuel economy standards.

Obama said that when Jackson was EPA chief, the agency took prudent and significant steps “to protect the air we breathe and the water we drink.” Jackson also contended with Republican lawmakers, who claimed that she devised a massive regulatory overreach that had restricted U.S. economic growth. Jackson, the first black administrator of the EPA, also released a statement to say that she was "confident the (EPA) ship is sailing in the right direction."

Read the entire article Lisa Jackson will step down as EPA chief

Navistar International Corp. is being fined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for its inadequacies in the pollution-control technology that the agency helped develop. Navistar inked an agreement in 2004 to take a pollution-control technology that EPA scientists invented. The engine-maker then assimilated the technology to its engines.

In fact, according to Patrick Charbonneau, Navistar's vice president for government relations, the EPA's technologies continue to be a part of the company's engine designs. EPA is receiving royalty payments for allowing Navistar to use the technologies. EPA officials said that the technology would help companies like Navistar meet the agency's rules without employing expensive catalytic-reduction devices.

However, EPA’s technology seemed to have failed Navistar, as the company’s engines have too much nitrous oxide emissions and the agency is now fining the engine-maker for that.

Read the entire article EPA fines business partner Navistar for high-emission levels of its engines

The official fuel economy figures of Mazda’s all-new 2013 CX-5 compact SUV that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had rated indicated a highway mileage rating of as high as 35 miles per gallon (mpg) for some models. Mazda North American Operations (MNAO) announced that Mazda's first vehicle integrated with SKYACTIV TECHNOLOGY provides unmatched non-hybrid best-in-class fuel economy for all transmission and drivetrain configurations.

The EPA rated the front-wheel-drive models with the standard SKYACTIV-MT six-speed manual transmission to have an estimated fuel economy of 26 city/35 highway/29 combined mpg.

When the front-wheel-drive models are fitted with the optional SKYACTIV-Drive six-speed automatic transmission, they offer an mpg rating of 26 city/32 highway/29 combined.

Read the entire article 2013 Mazda CX-5 rated at 26 city/35 highway mpg by EPA

Supercars are not typically known for being environmentally friendly, which is why the 592hp 2012 McLaren MP4-12C is all the more impressive. The EPA said that the car was able to avoid the punitive federal gas-guzzler tax. However, the launch of the MP4-12C was put off until early January in the U.S. just so it could resolve some minor issues with quality.

According to the EPA, the 2012 McLaren MP4-12C offers a fuel economy rating of 15 mpg in city driving and 22 mpg on the highway. This means that it is exempted from the gas-guzzler tax. In comparison, the 2012 Aston Martin Rapide returns 13 mpg in city driving and 19 mpg on the highway.

Another rival, the 2012 Lamborghini Aventador, returns 11 mpg in city driving and 17 mpg on the highway. The EPA clarified that with these figures, these two cars would have to pay the federal gas-guzzler tax. Tony Joseph, director of McLaren's North American Operation, told Inside Line that this is a “big achievement" and that gas prices are not a buying consideration but it does allow the company to claim that it’s an innovative firm.

Read the entire article EPA says that the McLaren MP4-12C avoids the gas-guzzler tax

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has classified the 2012 Fisker Karma as a subcompact. It’s absurd for this range-extended plug-in hybrid to be considered as one since it measures 16.5-feet long, its width exceeds 6 feet and it weighs more than 2.5 tons. It also features an impressive 403-horsepower electric powerplant.

Apparently, the EPA looks at interior volume (not overall measurements) when finding the size categories. The Fisker’s interior volume is less than the compact category’s requirement of at least 100 cubic-feet. This is crucial because the EPA determines size classifications for cars in order to apply CO2 reduction goals.

These targets are also known as fuel economy standards. The $96,000 Fisker is an exotic luxury sedan with four seats similar to most four-place exotic sports sedans.

Read the entire article 2012 Fisker Karma is a 2.5 tons subcompact, according to EPA