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News and Information about honeywell

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Honeywell and DuPont face EU complaint over coolant

Honeywell International Inc. and DuPont Co. are facing a European Union complaint for infringing antitrust rules over the only coolant that currently complies with standards on greenhouse-gas emissions. The European Commission may send the so-called statement of objections as early as next month, two people privy with the probe told Bloomberg.

The antitrust complaint is expected to intensify an investigation launched in 2011 aimed at Honeywell and DuPont's agreement to develop the chemical -- HFO-1234yf.  The probe, prompted by French company Arkema, also looked into Honeywell's alleged "deceptive conduct" when the chemical was endorsed by a car-industry trade group, and whether it charges "fair and reasonable" license fees to competing company who want to produce it .

The new chemical "is currently considerably more expensive" than its predecessor, remarked David Smith-Tilley, a director at IHS Automotive in London. "With patent-protected supply plus a more expensive manufacturing process, a price premium will exist for some time."

Read the entire article Honeywell and DuPont face EU complaint over coolant

Federal-Mogul to buy Honeywell’s brake friction division for $155 million

Federal-Mogul Corp. has reached an agreement to acquire the automotive and industrial brake friction business of Honeywell International Inc. for around $155 million. Federal-Mogul will also take control of Honeywell site in China and Romania. The friction materials business, based in Glinde, Germany, is expected to operate with no planned staffing changes or interruption in production while the agreement is finalized, Honeywell said in a statement.

The business employs over 2,000 people around the world. According to Honeywell, the agreement might result to an after-tax loss of 4 cents per share that will be recorded in the fourth quarter of 2013, but would not affect its financial outlook for 2014.

The agreement, which is expected to be completed in the second half of 2014, has caused Federal-Mogul shares to rise. Federal-Mogul is No. 50 on the Automotive News list of the top 100 global suppliers, with an estimated $4.3 billion in sales to carmakers in 2012.

Read the entire article Federal-Mogul to buy Honeywell’s brake friction division for $155 million

Honeywell sees significant growth in turbo chargers by 2018

Honeywell International Inc. expects the use of turbo chargers to boost power in smaller engines to increase quickly over the next five years, with China experiencing the most growth.  Driving this growth is the pressure to cut fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions – a viable solution of which is to reduce engine size.

Terrence Hahn, president and chief executive of Honeywell Transportation Systems, remarked that turbo charging is a no-compromise solution." He said that Turbo chargers force-feed a more compressed air-fuel mixture that burns more efficiently in gasoline and diesel engines, thereby improving performance and acceleration in smaller engines, without compromising fuel efficiency.

Honeywell, which is currently the largest turbo charger maker in the world, expects the devices to be installed on around 40 percent of vehicles sold globally in 2018. The company’s forecast is in line with that of the independent sector, amounting to more than 32 million vehicles.

Read the entire article Honeywell sees significant growth in turbo chargers by 2018

KBA says new Honeywell coolant poses no material risk

Germany's Federal Motor Transport Authority (KBA) has determined that the new air conditioning coolant produced by Honeywell and DuPont - HFO-1234yf – poses no material risk to vehicle occupants even if it is riskier than a an older alternative being phased out to comply with environmental rules

KBA conducted safety tests on the new coolant following claims from German carmaker Daimler that HFO-1234yf poses a greater fire risk than initially believed.

KBA’s report on the new refrigerant also came after the French government refused to register several of Daimler's new-model Mercedes-Benz units that use the older refrigerant, saying that the older coolant failed to meet new European environmental standards. KBA recommended further assessment of the HFO-1234yf to limit risks as much as possible.

Read the entire article KBA says new Honeywell coolant poses no material risk

Honeywell International Inc. has dismissed Daimler AG's safety concerns over the R1234yf air-conditioning coolant it and DuPont produce, according to a report by Handelsblatt newspaper, citing Honeywell European government affairs manager Tim Vink. Daimler has been refusing to use the coolant in its vehicles, saying that R1234yf can emit toxic hydrogen fluoride gas when it burns.

Vink told the German newspaper that the tests that Daimler conducted “were static and don't reflect the course of a real accident." The German carmaker is continuing to use an older refrigerant called R134a, which has been banned throughout the European Union from the start of 2013 as it is a potent global warming agent.

Daimler’s adamant stance in refusing the R1234yf has led France to stop registrations of Mercedes A-class, B-class and SL cars produced after June 2013. EU member nations also agreed on July 17, 2013, to take steps to bring all vehicles within the rules.

Read the entire article Honeywell shrugs off concerns on its R1234yf coolant

An innovative air-conditioning refrigerant, the HFO-1234yf, is safe to use, according to preliminary results released by SAE International, an automotive engineering association. The HFO-1234yf is developed by Honeywell International Inc. and DuPont Co. and is the only coolant that complies with new European Union climate guidelines.

However, it has been the focus of a recent dispute between Honeywell and German carmaker Daimler AG. According to Daimler, a field test conducted by its engineers found out that a mixture of HFO-1234yf and air-conditioning compressor oil released under the hood of a car could cause fire on the hot surface of an engine and deadly gas.

Daimler’s test made the auto industry and the EU commission SAE International to conduct a study to find out whether a mistake was committed in the years of tests that showed the coolant was perfectly safe.

Read the entire article SAE International says Honeywell’s new coolant is safe to use

Honeywell and partner DuPont Co. have invested hundreds of millions of dollars to develop, market and produce HFO-1234yf, a new kind of coolant or refrigerant that meets new European Union climate guidelines. However, field testing conducted by engineers at Daimler and its Mercedes-Benz unit in early August 2012 revealed some shocking test results.

The engineers simulated a leak in the air conditioning line of a Mercedes B class, and released a fine mixture of the HFO-1234yf refrigerant and A/C compressor oil, which sprayed across the vehicle's turbo-charged 1.6-liter engine. But then, the substance ignited as soon as it struck the hot surface, thereby releasing a toxic, corrosive gas as it burned.

Then, the vehicle’s windshield turned milky white as lethal hydrogen fluoride started disintegrating the glass. Stefan Geyer, a senior Daimler engineer who conducted the tests, said they were “frozen in shock.”

Read the entire article Honeywell’s new refrigerant catches fire during Daimler testing

The world's leading automotive turbocharger developer, Honeywell Transportation Systems, predicts that sales of turbocharged light vehicles in the U.S. would triple by 2017.  According to Honeywell, sales of turbocharged light vehicles in the US would reach around 4 million units in 2017 from just 1.3 million units in 2011.

The turbocharger maker also predicts that around 25% of light vehicles sold in the US will be turbocharged in 2017. Tony Schultz, vice president of the Americas for Honeywell Turbocharger Technologies, said the spark in demand would be the result of carmakers adopting downsized powertrains with turbochargers in order to meet federal Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFÉ) targets. Schultz remarked that he does expect any slowdown in the downsized powertrain adoption rate in North America.

Honeywell also outlined five-year forecasts for turbo sales in other key markets like China, India and Europe. The company expects sales in China and India to triple to 6.7 million and 3 million units respectively by 2017. Honeywell also expects a 35-percent increase in sales in Europe to 35% to 17.4 million units, as carmakers turbocharge more gasoline-powered vehicles.

Read the entire article Honeywell expects US sales of turbo light vehicles to triple by 2017

Honeywell anticipates that second-generation gasoline turbochargers, including the new "Gasoline DualBoost," would be released within three years. Honeywell, which is the largest turbocharger maker in the world, claims that the "Gasoline DualBoost" weighs 30% less, 30% smaller, and is able to attain up to 70% less inertia compared with the existing similar turbos.

In an Automotive News Europe interview, Honeywell Turbo Technologies Vice President of Engineering Craig Balis said that engines could be downsized even further. He added that cutting inertia aids in speeding up the acceleration rate of the turbo so that boost pressure could build up quicker.

He explained that the end result is a turbo that’s both more responsive and more efficient, boosting performance and fuel efficiency. European automakers have to cut CO2 emissions before the more stringent regulations take effect in 2012. According to Roland Berger, the demand for turbos in light vehicles will increase from an estimated 18.2 million in 2011 to 30.4 million in 2015.

Read the entire article Honeywell to launch its second-generation gasoline turbochargers within three years

The patent infringement lawsuit filed by BorgWarner Inc. against Honeywell International Inc. over a titanium wheel featured in engine turbochargers has been resolved with a $32.5 million settlement. In a statement, Honeywell said that this settlement is far less than what BorgWarner had been aiming to get (at more than $100 million).

This settlement would also give Honeywell a license to these patents. The trial for the complaint that BorgWarner filed in 2007 had been set to start earlier this week in a federal court in Asheville, N.C. Honeywell referred to this settlement as the “best solution for Honeywell and its customers.”

As governments aim to impose more stringent fuel-economy standards, automakers seek to increasingly use turbochargers. These devices compress air to boost the smaller engines’ power and efficiency. Last March, Honeywell said that it anticipates that by 2015, use of the turbochargers in new U.S. vehicles will double.

Read the entire article Honeywell to pay $32.5 million to BorgWarner to end patent suit

Honeywell Transportation Systems expects a major increase in the demand for eco-friendly turbocharger engines in Europe considering that its clients such as Renault SA, Volkswagen AG, and Ford Motor Co., will have to comply with tougher regulations on emissions, the company’s chief executive officer Alex Ismail said in an interview with Automotive News Europe. Specifically, the turbo penetration for light cars and truck is predicted to increase from 65% to 69%.

A Honeywell data reveals that around 14.9 million cars in Europe are expected to have turbochargers this year, an increase from 13.9 million last year, with the forecast of a 3% increase in the 2011 production of Europe trucks and cars taken into consideration.

Honeywell saw 22 million units sold at its global turbocharger industry last year, and Ismail estimates that it will grow 10% each year until 2015, reaching 35 million units by that time.

Read the entire article Honeywell predicts a strong rise in turbocharger penetration in Europe

Honeywell International Inc. predicts that by 2015, the use of turbochargers will double in new U.S. automobiles as the market grows due to tighter fuel economy standards. Honeywell is based in Morris Township, New Jersey, and is the world's largest maker of turbochargers. Around 20% of engines produced in the U.S., Canada and Mexico will include turbochargers, a 9% increase from the estimate for this year.

The U.S. figure is lower than the predicted 67% penetration rate this year in Europe, 28% in India and 13% in China. Alex Ismail, head of the company's transportation systems division, said that the U.S. has one of the lowest turbo use in the world, which makes it an "emerging region from a turbo standpoint.”

He also said to Autonews, that Honeywell's turbochargers were adopted for gas- or diesel-burning engines in vehicles, including Tata Motors Ltd.'s Nano, with its 0.8- liter engine, and a Caterpillar Inc. mining truck with a 100-liter engine.

Read the entire article Honeywell says that the use of turbochargers will double due to tighter fuel economy standards
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