Evora GT430 Sport is now the lightest and fastest Lotus high-performance sports car

Article by Christian A., on September 7, 2017

The latest iteration of the Lotus Evora – the Evora GT430 – has been described by the carmaker as its most potent road-going model so far. It is the lightest and most powerful Evora. But Evora is introducing a version of the Evora GT430 that is as powerful, but is lighter and faster. Welcome the new Lotus Evora GT430 Sport, which is available to order now.

Still powering the new Lotus Evora GT430 Sport is a 3.5-liter supercharged and charge-cooled V6 engine that is tuned to provide 430 hp (436 PS) of max output at 7,000 rpm as well as 440 Nm (325 lb.-ft.) of peak torque available at 4,500 rpm. This allows the new Lotus Evora GT430 Sport to accelerate from zero to 60 mph in just 3.7 seconds, as quick as the new Lotus Evora GT430.

The V6 engine sends power to the wheels of the Evora GT430 Sport through a six-speed manual transmission with a low-inertia, single-mass flywheel or – starting January 2018 – a six-speed automatic transmission that employs an optimized gearbox ECU for ultra-fast changes and lightweight aluminum paddles mounted to the steering wheel. The six-speed automatic gearbox will also be offered on the Evora GT430 starting January 2018.

Interestingly, the automatic versions of the Evora GT430 and the Evora GT430 Sport come with 10 Nm more torque (to 450 Nm), allowing these high-performance sports to complete the 0-60 mph sprint around 0.1 seconds faster to 3.6 seconds.

However, the new Lotus Evora GT430 Sport has a dry weight of 1248 kg, making it 10 kg lighter than the 1258-kg Evora GT430, thereby bringing the power-to-weight ratio to 345 hp per ton. This was achieved by getting rid of some aerodynamic elements like the massive profiled carbon wing, carbon fiber splitter, as well as louvers on top of each front wheel arch. However, despite the absence of these aerodynamic elements, Lotus was still able to conjure some magic – by employing two larger carbon fiber front ducts with integrated air blades, curved rear edges of the front wheel arch panels, as well as sculpted ducts behind each rear wheel. Thanks to these features, the Evora GT430 Sport could generate up to 100 kg of downforce at 196 mph.

Of course, the new Evora GT430 Sport – just like the Evora GT430 – features a number of racy elements like the Ohlins TTX two-way adjustable dampers, a Torsen-type limited slip differential (LSD) and an adjustable traction control system, as well as J-grooved and ventilated brake discs as paired with AP Racing four-piston calipers all round.

Since Evora GT430 Sport has a top speed of 196 mph (315 km/h) – compared to Evora GT430’s 190 mph (305 km/h) – it has become the fastest Lotus production car so far.

Inside, the Evora GT430 Sport employs matt black interior panels, Lotus’ detailed carbon race seats, new carbon door sills and a new lightweight carbon instrument binnacle cover, and an instrument panel with new design graphic. Black Alcantara and perforated leather wrap the steering wheel, door panels, dashboard, transmission tunnel and center console – complemented by red-and-white stitching.

Press Release

LOTUS EVORA GT430 SPORT JOINS THE LINE-UP

Following the stunning debut of the Lotus Evora GT430, Lotus has introduced an expanded Evora GT430 line-up designed to appeal to a wider range of customers who want the ultimate in high performance sports cars.

Adding to the acclaimed Evora 400 and Evora Sport 410 models, the new Evora GT430 range now includes two body options and a choice of manual or automatic transmission. Joining the recently announced Evora GT430 is the Evora GT430 Sport, a new member of the family that carries the same phenomenal firepower and sculptured body-style but without the additional downforce-creating aerodynamic elements. Both models are powered by the same 3.5-litre V6 supercharged and charge cooled engine, producing 430 hp and 440 Nm of torque (Automatic version: 450 Nm).

Without the aerodynamic elements, the Evora GT430 Sport weighs 10kg less at 1248 kg (dry), bringing the power-to-weight ratio to 345 hp / tonne and the top speed to 196 mph (315 km/h) making it the fastest Lotus production car ever.

The Evora GT430 is differentiated from the Evora GT430 Sport through the inclusion of motorsport derived aerodynamics provided by a carbon fibre splitter, a large, profiled carbon wing and louvers on top of each front wheel arch which reduce pressure within the front wheel arches together with wider wheels and tyres.

Automatic transmission will be available from January 2018 for both the Evora GT430 body configurations. With 10 Nm more torque (450 Nm), the Automatic version is even quicker, with a 0-60 mph time of 3.6 seconds. The six-speed automatic transmission utilises an optimised gearbox ECU for ultra-fast changes, whilst gear selection is made via lightweight aluminium paddles mounted to the steering wheel.

Boasting a high specification, the new Evora GT430 range includes, as standard, Öhlins TTX two-way adjustable dampers, J-grooved and ventilated brake discs - paired with AP Racing four-piston calipers all round, a Torsen-type limited slip differential (LSD) and an adjustable traction control system.

Announced last month, the Evora GT430 has already proved a knock-out success. Jean-Marc Gales, CEO, Group Lotus plc said, “The Evora GT430 already has cemented its place as a true collector’s car, but we know that many of our customers want the option of choosing a less aggressive version, with the same power, but without some of more arresting design and aero elements. With the Evora GT430 Sport, we have responded to this demand to add to the whole range of thoroughbred Lotus cars that are great on the track as well as supremely capable on the road.”

Lotus Evora GT430 line-up in more detail
The new Evora GT430 Sport makes full use of carbon fibre to help hit its low kerb weight. This means that standard components include full carbon front and rear bumpers, front access panel, roof panel, rear quarter panels as well as a one-piece louvered tailgate with integrated spoiler.

The whole of the Evora GT430 range also benefits from advanced aerodynamics, including two enlarged carbon fibre front ducts, with integrated air blades, to efficiently move air though to the front wheel cavities and reduce turbulence created by the wheels. The curved rear edges of the front wheel arch panels also play a role, channelling air along the side of the car, while sculpted ducts behind each rear wheel vent airflow as quickly as possible from the wheel arches, balancing downforce. As a result, the Evora GT430 Sport generates up to 100 kg of downforce at 196 mph, some 56% more than the Evora Sport 410. The Evora GT430 generates up to 250 kg of downforce at 190 mph.

Jean-Marc Gales continued, “This is a car that epitomises a purity of engineering that many car manufacturers fail to match. Lotus founder, Colin Chapman not only pursued lightweight design, and pioneered the use carbon fibre in F1, but he also led the way in the field of aerodynamics in road and race cars. The Evora GT430 range continues this legacy, combining our expertise in highly efficient engineering and aerodynamics with more power and torque to provide one of the most rounded and rewarding driving experiences on the road or track.”

Once inside, the use of visible-weave, carbon composite components continues. These include Lotus’ beautifully detailed carbon race seats, new carbon door sills and a new lightweight carbon instrument binnacle cover with a new design of graphic on the instrument panel. The steering wheel, dashboard, door panels, transmission tunnel and centre console are all trimmed in a combination of black Alcantara® and perforated leather, complemented by contrast twin colour stitching, in red and white, and matt black interior panels.

An integrated touch-screen infotainment system can be specified, including iPod® connectivity and Bluetooth® functionality, satellite navigation and reversing camera.

The variable traction control function, standard on all models, is linked directly to the ECU and allows the amount of wheel slip to be set by the driver whilst in ‘Race / Off’. The Evora GT430 has 10 mm wider Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tyres with 245/35 R19 at the front and 295/30 R20 at the rear, on one inch wider 10.5J rear wheels – these are optional fit for the Evora GT430 Sport.

Every new Lotus Evora GT430 Sport can be personalised through the increasingly popular Lotus Exclusive programme. Developed by the Lotus Design team to inspire customers, it combines traditional British craftsmanship with the best of modern design, and allows owners to tailor vehicles to their personal taste. Since its introduction last year, roughly a third of all new Lotus cars now undergo some form of customisation.

The new, fully homologated Lotus Evora GT430 range is available in two-seater configuration only and can be ordered now.

Source: Lotus Cars

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