BMW reviving the Triumph badge

Article by Christian A., on March 1, 2012

BMW is reviving the Triumph badge. BMW wants to be able to use the laurel wreath badge on a broad range of products and to do that, it applied for a European trademark for the Triumph badge that was most recently seen on the Acclaim saloon in 1984. BMW filed the trademark application on October 27 and published it on December 21.

BMW’s application is categorized as ‘Community Trade Mark E10374627’. The application covers vehicles, jewelry, books, watches, luggage, textiles, leather products, luggage, and Christmas tree decorations. When BMW purchased the Rover Group from British Aerospace in 1994, it took over several ‘heritage brands’, such as Austin, Morris, Wolesley, Riley and Triumph.

BMW was divided and in 2000, Rover was sold off but Riley and Triumph were retained. The other defunct auto badges were kept in the Rover portfolio. It was rumored more than a decade ago that BMW would revive Triumph or the Austin-Healey brand. It was initially meant to be a more affordable, four-cylinder version of the Z4 roadster.

Autocar confirmed that this car was really engineered. Sometime in the middle of the previous decade, there were speculations that BMW’s Designworks studios had made a proposal that the future Roadster version of the Mini will be styled and then sold off as a Triumph roadster. Mini dealers had vetoed this proposal as they didn’t want to have to handle having another revived brand name.

But then, it’s notable that Triumph’s TR-series of cars had higher sales in the US than MG. It is believed that BMW bosses are more confident in Triumph as a global brand than they did in MG. It is likely that a Triumph revival in the medium term will mean the release of a range of Mini-based roadsters.

The Triumph TR range of cars was produced by the Triumph Motor Company in the UK, between 1953 and 1981. The first of the production TRs – the Triumph TR2 – was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in March 1953. The TR2 was the basis of the succeeding TR cars up to TR6. The TR6 was produced from 1968 to 1976.

Then in 1974, Triumph introduced the TR7, an all-new design without any reference from the TR2, except from the model designation. Featuring a wedge shape, the TR7 sports car was initially available as a coupe, while a convertible version followed in 1979. In the same year, the British carmaker introduced the Triumph TR8, which is essentially a premium V8 version of the TR7. Production of both the TR7 and TR8 were stopped in 1981.

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