A street-legal version of the Aston Martin Vulcan will be available courtesy of RML Group

Article by Christian A., on April 27, 2016

If we were to describe the Aston Martin Vulcan in four words, it would be the “Beauty and the Beast”. The Vulcan is a combination of menacing and captivating especially when it is inside the race track. Just by the sound of its menacing roar combined with its “space age looks”, the Vulcan can draw so much attention from its audience. At the same time, it can easily intimidate its competitors.

The Vulcan is powered by a naturally-aspirated 7.0-liter V12 engine mounted in the front that is capable of producing 800 horsepower on its rear wheels. It is capable of covering 0 to 60 mph in less than 3.0 seconds and can reach a top speed of more than 200 mph. All these incredible qualities and more are attached to its price tag of $2.3 million. There have only been 24 of these exclusive Astons produced since its introduction to the market.

Aston Martin Vulcan is a track-only vehicle; meaning that it’s meant for race tracks and not for road use. One possible reason why Aston Martin refuses to make a roadworthy version of the Vulcan is that it will have to go through a lot of transformations. It will have to undergo physical modifications including raising its ride height and modifying gear ratios.

It will also have to pass all emissions requirements and meet standard safety simulations. There will be a lot of work to be done with the Vulcan if a road-use version is made but these things take time. They are also firm with their commitment to keep the track-only Vulcan as it is.

But even as Aston Martin wants to keep the Vulcan to be track-only, it cannot be denied that there will always be owners who will always dream of flaunting their cars along the busy streets of Paris or cruise through the Spanish countryside.

Now, thanks to Northamptonshire-based engineering company RML Group, the then far-off dream of a road-legal Vulcan will finally become reality. Aston Martin has given its support and endorsement to RML’s newest project to convert existing Vulcans from track-only to road-use versions.

RML’s company boss, Andy Palmer, says that even if there may have been some hesitation with a few Vulcan owners, there are many who are willing to take the challenge. As of now, RML is expecting around four or five owners that will take advantage of the chance to drive their Vulcans outside the race track – two of which are now under negotiation.

RML will be focused in modifying the Vulcan to become safer and roadworthy; it will also be addressing dilemma that once concerned Aston Martin regarding the car’s physical attributes. It will take about three months before the track-only Vulcan can become fully functional for road-use.

We’re also hoping that while RML tinkers through some of the body parts, there will be no changes with its 7.0-liter V12 and 800 horsepower. Palmer assures us that the road-use version of the Vulcan will still possess the same pizzazz as that of the track-only version.

All these work will not come cheap, so expect the conversion to be priced somewhere along a six-figure range. The only sad part is, the conversion cannot be available to all especially to U.S. owners due to vehicle registration laws in the country so U.S.-based Vulcans will have to be content at spending their entire lives at the track.

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