BMW documents suggest that there will not be a manual Toyota Supra

Article by Christian A., on August 11, 2017

Earlier this week, some internal documents from BMW have been leaked. And naturally, car enthusiasts would be curious to know what juicy details they would find in these files. So what has been revealed are some info on the models that will replace the BMW Z4 and the Toyota Supra’s future successor.

The 177-page long document suggest it to be a list of the German automaker’s designation for cars and motorcycles. This also includes details of BMW’s partners including Rolls Royce, Land Rover, and Toyota. We do not know whether the document is original or a fraud, but a spokesperson of BMW Australia refused to comment when asked regarding its authenticity.

The documents confirm that the Supra will only be available in automatic transmission. This is not fresh news regarding the Japanese sports coupe, but what’s new is the fact that the company will not be giving it a manual transmission at all. United States customers will only be getting two engine options for the Supra which are: the four-cylinder unit with 248 horsepower (185 kilowatts) and the 335 horsepower (250 kilowatts) six-cylinder unit. Luckily, European customers will get another option that is the four-cylinder unit. The automatic gearbox will give power to the rear wheels only.

Unlike the Japanese version, the car’s German counterpart will be available in the same engine options, but will be available in a manual transmission (for all variants) - that includes the range-topping M40i. Similarly, power will be brought to the rear wheels. So far, we only know of the 195 horsepower (145 kW) entry-level 20i model. But this model will definitely be joined by other variants later on in its lifecycle.

A lot of readers will be disappointed to hear that there won’t be a manual Supra. But don’t lose hope, because according to a source from Bimmerpost, a lot of models are not listed in this document (considering that it is a few months old), and the company might actually have a manual version of it that is not listed.

This is actually pretty common practice for automakers. The fact that they do not list all the models on the documents, and one day, you will just see a prototype being test driven on the roads. Some of these models even get shipped to Woodcliff Lake as part of the evaluation process.

Since none of the information have been confirmed by the BMW and Toyota, we cannot make conclusions just yet.

Source: supramkv.com

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