Luxembourg police goes electric with purchase of 2 Tesla Model S as patrol cars

Article by Christian A., on August 19, 2017

Police cars, especially those doing rounds patrolling the streets and chasing criminals, should be both quick and fast. After all, police officers don’t want the one they’re chasing in a hot pursuit operation to evade the law. But could an electric vehicle, like the Tesla Model S, do such an arduous job? The police force in Luxembourg confidently believes that Tesla’s fully electric sedan is up to the task.

According to RTL news, the Grand-Ducale police of Luxembourg has already confirmed that they have ordered two Tesla Model S sedans to be employed as patrol cars. The purchase of the new electrified cars from Tesla is actually part of a program being implemented by the Ministry of Sustainable Development to adopt electric cars as the government’s primary mode of transport.

Furthermore, the police force won't be the only government employees to be riding on electric cars as Luxembourg is also reportedly planning to acquire electric vehicles for use by administrative employees.

The report didn’t specify which version of the Tesla Model S will be acquired by Grand Ducale police. However, it is of note that all versions of the Model S are generally quicker and faster than some, if not all, police cars.

The Grand Ducale police might opt for the P100D Ludicrous version of the Model S, which is currently considered as the quickest production car with the ability to accelerate from zero to 60 mph in just 2.5 seconds, as per Tesla’s own online configurator. Powered by a 100 kWh battery with Performance All-Wheel Drive, the Model S P100D has a range of up to 315 miles (EPA rated). With the ability to go as fast as 155 mph, the Model S P100D could be the right version the Grand Ducale is looking for.

However, the current base version of the electric car, the Model S 75 RWD, is also not a joke on the road. This version of the Model S could sprint from zero to 60 mph in 4.3 seconds and could go as fast as 140 mph. Powered by a 75 kWh battery, the Model S 75 RWD has an EPA-rated range of 249 miles. Even with this version, the police could outsprint and out-speed most cars on the road.

Interestingly, the government of Luxembourg won't have to worry about the range of electric cars. After all, the country is only 51 miles (82 km) long and 35 miles (57 km) wide. This means that even the base version of the Tesla Model S could go across the country’s length four times and still have extra range to catch some crooks.

To note, the Grand Ducale police isn’t the first police department to employ electric vehicles. In fact, the city of Los Angeles took delivery of 100 BMW i3s and two Tesla Model S sedans last year. However, the LA police won't be actually using them as patrol cars, but as service vehicles for support employees or investigation teams. LA police claims these EVs don’t have enough range or speed to serve as patrol cars.

Source: electrek.co

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