Volkswagen Renntransporter is home on the wheels for your Porsche 935

Article by Christian A., on October 15, 2018

Just last month, Porsche unveiled the new 935 during the “Rennsport Reunion” motorsport event at Laguna Seca Raceway in California. Featuring a body evoking the legendary Porsche 935/78, the 935 is definitely a race car you would want to drive in the track. Nonetheless, it isn't car you can just drive on the road from your garage to the track. After all, the 935 is a track-only race car and can’t be driven legally on the road.

The problem of getting a track-only race car from a garage to the circuit without circumventing any laws or local ordinances has already been solved a long time ago. To solve such a logistic issue, teams or carmakers have been using transporters, which can be large enough to accommodate more than one race car.

Such a situation is the main theme of one of the latest creative visual projects of Igor Shikitov, an automotive designer from Moscow, Russia. Posted at the Behance social creative site on October 3, 2018, Shikitov’s work was aptly titled “Volkswagen Renntransporter.” After all Porsche is now part of the Volkswagen Group.

The Volkswagen Renntransporter reminds us of the ingenuity of car companies before the Second World War. At that time, racing cars were transported from the factory where they were built to the circuit where they competed. Mercedes-Benz was first to carmaker to employ special trucks to transport its racing cars in a fast yet safe manner. Called “Blue Wonder” because of their blue finish, these trucks can go as fast as 106 mph at some point. They also had the privilege of carrying the original Silver Arrows, as well as the legendary W194 and W196 race cars.

In the 1960s, Porsche employed a pair of special trucks that were also made by Mercedes. Wrapped in a dark red color scheme and bearing large Porsche letterings, these trucks were specially modified versions of the Mercedes 0 317 Renntransporter and carried Porsche race cars like the 917 and 956.

On the other hand, the Volkswagen Renntransporter, as Shikitov imagines, would be used to transport the Porsche 935 from the garage to the circuit track. Of course, it can also be used to transport other track-only vehicles. Nonetheless, Shikitov’s graphic renderings make the design and styling of the Volkswagen Renntransporter more suitable for being the home on the road for the 935.

Design- and styling-wise, the Volkswagen Renntransporter features a dark red exterior scheme that pays tribute to the Mercedes O 317 Renntransporter for Porsche. Large enough to transport two Porsche 935s at the same time, the Volkswagen Renntransporter feature large VW logo and‘Porsche’ letterings on the front section. Smaller Porsche letterings are found on the sides. The clear glass side panel with the Porsche logo allows the 935s to be visible from the outside. The 935 enters and exits the Volkswagen Renntransporter through an automatic foldable ramp on the rear, or through a lift.

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